Underground Compound of 4 Fallout Shelters in Montana Awaits Buyer To Burrow In

When spectacular mountain views are available, nearby homes almost always feature an abundance of windows to soak in the vistas.

However, this property in Montana heads in a completely opposite direction. These four homes have no windows at all—they’re completely underground.

The quartet of below-ground homes sit beneath 10.6 acres in Paradise Valley near Emigrant, MT, just north of Yellowstone National Park.

Listed for $1.75 million, the earth-sheltered homes were originally built as fallout shelters. They offer all the amenities a comfortable residence requires—albeit with curved walls.

Views of Montana
Views of Montana

Theresa Lunn

Entrances
Entrances

Theresa Lunn

Entrance
Entrance

Theresa Lunn

Three of out of the four homes measure in at about 2,500 square feet, and each features multiple bedrooms, bathrooms, and living spaces.

The fourth home is significantly larger, with space to accommodate a crowd looking for a real escape.

“The largest one has several bunk rooms, so you could have more than a couple people in there,” says the listing agent, Theresa Lunn.

Each boasts a basement for food and supplies storage and to house all of the mechanicals.

___

Watch: Live Outside the Box in This Cool Cubic Condo

___

The earth keeps the houses at a constant 50 to 55 degrees and to increase the temperature as needed, each home is equipped with its own HVAC and ventilation system.

“It never feels musty in there with the air circulation system. It always smells fresh,” Lunn says.

Exterior
Exterior

Theresa Lunn

Kitchen
Kitchen

Theresa Lunn

Kitchen
Kitchen

Theresa Lunn

Game room
Game room

Theresa Lunn

Bedroom
Bedroom

Theresa Lunn

Each home comes with its own kitchen, complete with appliances.

“Once you’re in there, they’re comfortable. It’s just like you’re in a house,” Lunn explains. “You walk down hallways, but then you just you walk into a kitchen that you think is your mom’s kitchen—a great area, bedrooms, very nice bathrooms.”

One house features a pool table in the rec room.

The current owner is a builder and is willing to sweeten the deal for a buyer who might be interested in buying the land and the underground homes.

“He would put a very nice [above-ground] home for an extra $240,000 onto the list price. Underneath the house, it would have a discrete entrance into shelter No. 4,” Lunn explains. “The additional house has not been built. He is offering that as a buyer package, if someone wanted that.”

Hallway
Hallway

Theresa Lunn

Bedroom
Bedroom

Theresa Lunn

Interior
Interior

Theresa Lunn

The Paradise Valley area is known for its outdoor activities.

“It’s arguably one of the most beautiful places in the U.S., for sure. It’s a huge mecca for fly fishermen,” Lunn says, adding hunting, hiking, snowmobiling, four-wheeling, and horseback riding are also popular.

“It’s a great spot for vacation rentals,” Lunn says, adding that renting an underground home could offer a unique allure for guests. “If you bought this, you could live in it and still rent it out. It’s also a great retreat possibility.”

Bathroom
Bathroom

Theresa Lunn

Storage
Storage

Theresa Lunn

Entrance
Entrance

Theresa Lunn

Lunn says buyers have shown an interest in the property—ranging from those in search of a sustainable property, to folks who desire the ultimate in protection.

The agent says she doesn’t like to use the term “preppers,” because of the negative connotations attached to the term. But she acknowledges that that is basically what people do when they store supplies in underground bunkers.

“If our great-grandparents didn’t prep, none of us would be here,” she says. “It’s just being prepared.”

Mechanicals
Mechanicals

Theresa Lunn

Mechanicals
Mechanicals

Theresa Lunn

Mechanicals
Mechanicals

Theresa Lunn

Mechanicals
Mechanicals

Theresa Lunn

The homes are currently attached to the electrical grid, but could be unhooked if a buyer decided to rely on the property’s own generators for power.

As in the case of most fallout shelters, the entrance to each home is through a thick door. Upon entry, the hallway takes a turn at a right angle.

“Any bunker worth its salt has to have those 90-degree turns, because nuclear and chemical material can’t go around [corners],” Lunn explains. “That’s really one of those tips of the trade for guys that are building bunkers.”

Lunn stresses these are regular homes where people would be very comfortable living or vacationing.

“[They’re not] some kind of freaky, end-of-the-world, zombie-apocalypse whatever. There is a lot of need for this type of property.”

Hallway
Hallway

Theresa Lunn

Entrance
Entrance

Theresa Lunn

Kitchen
Kitchen

Theresa Lunn

Bedroom
Bedroom

Theresa Lunn

Storage
Storage

Theresa Lunn

  • For more photos and details, check out the full listing.
  • Homes for sale in Emigrant, MT
  • Learn more about Emigrant, MT

Source: realtor.com

Waltz Away With a Cool Buy! Czech Dance Hall in Omaha Transformed Into a Residence

A place where people used to dance the polka all night long is available for purchase. Accordion not included.

The property on 13th Street in Omaha, NE, is on the market for $999,900, and offers an array of opportunities for an enterprising buyer.

“Originally, it was a Czechoslovakian dance hall, and then it was converted into a bar,” explains the listing agent, Drew Halvorson.

Built in 1895, the main hall was also a popular restaurant, before an artist and home renovator team purchased the property in 1993 and worked their magic. There are now three separate living spaces on the property.

The former dance hall became their home, and the parking lot was transformed into a 5,000-square-foot garden.

Vines, fountains, and plenty of other interesting touches decorate the space.

“When you first come in the gate, you walk into this very serene and beautiful garden,” Halvorson notes. “Once you get to the center of it, it opens up, and you have a big deck space and little seating areas throughout the entire courtyard.”

Exterior of former dance hall in Omaha, NE
Exterior of former dance hall in Omaha, NE

Joe Braun Photography

Exterior
Exterior

Joe Braun Photography

Garden
Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Garden
Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Deck
Deck

Joe Braun Photography

Garden
Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Deck
Deck

Joe Braun Photography

Vines
Vines

Joe Braun Photography

Entry
Entry

Joe Braun Photography

Interior
Interior

Joe Braun Photography

Living space
Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Living space
Living space

Joe Braun Photography

The main house measures 3,324 square feet, with two bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms. Overhead, the ceilings soar to a height of 20 feet.

___

Watch: Back to School? Giant Tennessee Home Was Once an Educational Institution

___

“An open floor plan and tons of natural light throughout the whole home from skylights,” Halvorson says, “It’s an entertainer’s dream.”

Living space
Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Living space
Living space

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen
Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen
Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Kitchen
Kitchen

Joe Braun Photography

Pantry
Pantry

Joe Braun Photography

The kitchen and dining areas sit just off the main living space. Halvorson touts the kitchen as a great space for gathering.

It has a large island, high-end appliances, a custom range hood, and a pantry with plenty of storage.

Master bathroom
Master bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Master bathroom
Master bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Bedroom
Bedroom

Joe Braun Photography

Master bedroom and loft area
Master bedroom and loft area

Joe Braun Photography

Bathroom
Bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

The two large bedrooms are upstairs, at opposite ends of the house, each accessed by a huge staircase.

Halvorson explains that the master bedroom has a fireplace, two walk-in closets on either side, and a huge, wraparound bathroom.

Rooftop view
Rooftop view

Joe Braun Photography

A ladder goes up into an additional space that the current owners use as a place for yoga and meditation. A door leads out to a rooftop deck with views of the city skyline.

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

The guesthouse on the property has two apartments. One has three bedrooms and 1.5 bathrooms, and the other is a basement unit with one bedroom and one bathroom.

Built in 1890, the building was originally called the Settlement House. It was used as a boarding house where immigrants could live until they learned English, found a job, and saved enough money to move out.

Guesthouse bathroom
Guesthouse bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

Both units could provide a buyer with steady revenue to offset the monthly mortgage payment.

“The property itself could provide some very good income,” says the agent.

Halvorson says the larger, two-story unit rents for $1,750 a month, and the smaller one nets about $750.

He’s targeting investors and adds that the units could serve either as long-term rentals or be offered as a nightly vacation rental.

The Omaha downtown area, zoo, and other attractions are nearby, making the spot attractive for vacation rentals.

Garden
Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Aerial view
Aerial view

Joe Braun Photography

Aerial view
Aerial view

Joe Braun Photography

There are also three detached garage spaces, a rarity in the neighborhood known as Little Bohemia.

“A one-car garage is a win in this old historic area of Omaha,” Halvorson says. “When it was originally built, there just were not a lot of garages or carriage houses whatsoever.”

Since the property was once zoned commercial, the new owners could keep the space as residential or convert it back into a bar or other commercial venture.

“The perfect buyer is probably somebody who has the vision for mixed use. Somebody who maybe wants to live in the main house and have some income on the side with the rental property. I think that would be perfect scenario No. 1,” Halvorson notes.

Scenario No. 2, he adds, might be somebody who decided to live in the main house and to turn the second house into a bar and use the courtyard as a beer garden.

Garden
Garden

Joe Braun Photography

Entry to courtyard
Entry to courtyard

Joe Braun Photography

Stairs
Stairs

Joe Braun Photography

Office
Office

Joe Braun Photography

Bathroom
Bathroom

Joe Braun Photography

Guesthouse
Guesthouse

Joe Braun Photography

View from rooftop
View from rooftop

Joe Braun Photography

  • For more photos and details, check out the full listing.
  • Homes for sale in Omaha, NE
  • Learn more about Omaha, NE

Source: realtor.com