Coding Bootcamp: Income Share Agreements vs. Bootcamp Loans

Key takeaways

  • Both coding bootcamp loans and ISAs can cover the costs of a coding bootcamp.

  • Students should exhaust free aid for bootcamps before turning to sources that require repayment, like loans and ISAs.

  • When borrowing money for a coding bootcamp, compare offers and choose the least expensive option.

While both can cover the costs of coding bootcamp and offer flexible repayment options, the best choice is the one that will cost you the least. Exhaust free funding opportunities like scholarships, workforce development grants, employer tuition assistance and veterans benefits before you borrow money for a coding bootcamp with an ISA or loan.

Income share agreements aren’t credit-based, unlike many bootcamp loans. So a good income share agreement could be a better option for those lacking a strong credit background.

Because income share agreements aren’t typically expressed in APR terms, it can be hard to tell if a bootcamp loan or ISA would be cheaper. Here’s what you need to know about each.

Coding bootcamp income share agreements

Bootcamp ISAs generally work like typical ISAs for traditional colleges. With both, a provider pays your school expenses. In return, you pay back a fixed percentage of your post-graduation income for a set term.

Income share agreements aren’t regulated, so each provider can set its own parameters. But for most, payments kick in only after you start to make a certain salary. The ISA provider will set the salary threshold, and if your salary falls below that amount, you don’t have to make payments.

Consider these factors when evaluating a bootcamp ISA:

  1. Income share percentage. This determines how much you’ll pay each month. Prioritize ISAs with repayment percentages at or below 10%. This will help keep total monthly bills manageable.

  2. Salary floor. This sets the minimum salary required for payments. Watch out for salary floors that are too low. Consider the cost of living and average salary in your area to determine what is too low for you. For context, the average salary in the U.S. in 2019 was nearly $52,000, according to the Social Security Administration.

  3. Payment cap. This is the maximum amount you’ll have to repay. Avoid ISAs with payment caps above two times the borrowed amount and those without payment caps at all, or you could repay far more than you got.

  4. Repayment term. This determines how long you’ll repay an ISA. Make sure to ask how the provider calculates months you aren’t obligated to make payments. Some may extend the term.

For example, the Lambda School’s ISA requires that you pay 17% of your gross post-graduation salary for 24 months. The payment salary floor is $50,000 per year.  If you make less than that, you don’t have to make payments. In that case, they could extend your term to up to 60 months. The Lambda School costs $15,000 for most students, and sets its total payment cap at $30,000. If you make $52,000 a year during that time, you can expect monthly payments of $737 and a total repayment amount of about $17,688.

Depending on the details of your ISA and your post-graduation salary, you could end up paying less than you borrowed or much more.

Coding bootcamp loans

Bootcamp loans may share some similarities with traditional student loans, but they aren’t student loans. Bootcamp loans are personal loans that are designed for bootcamp students. As such, they don’t come with the same protections and regulations that student loans do.

Consider these features when evaluating a bootcamp loan:

  1. Interest rate. This determines how much your loan will cost. Bootcamp loan interest rates can reach beyond 25%. Always go with the lending source that will cost the least and avoid lenders that charge 36% interest or higher.

  2. Repayment options. These determine how soon and under what conditions you’ll have to start making payments. Look for loans that offer several repayment options. These can include immediate repayment, where you make payments while you’re in school, and deferred repayment, where you start making payments after graduation.

  3. Soft credit check. A soft credit check for preapproval allows you to see which interest rates and terms you qualify for without affecting your credit. Compare rates from several lenders that provide them with only a soft credit check to ensure you get the best rate.

  4. Origination fee. This is a fee that a lender may charge to process the loan. It is usually expressed as a percentage of your loan amount and may be added to the loan principal, where it will increase the total repayment amount.

For example, Skills Fund offers three- and five-year repayment terms with interest rates from 6.5% to 13.75%. It doesn’t have a formal forbearance program, but it does offer four repayment options. Those who choose the deferred repayment option also typically get a three-month grace period after graduation before having to start payments.

Skills Fund provides preapproval with a soft credit check. It also charges borrowers a 5% origination fee, which it adds to the loan balance. So a $15,000 loan would come with a $750 origination fee on top. Such a loan at 13.75% over five years would cost about $364 a month and come with a total repayment cost of about $21,866. If that loan had a 6.5% interest rate at three years, your monthly payments would be about $483. Your total repayment would be around $17,378.

Which costs less: Bootcamp loan or ISA?

Determining if a bootcamp ISA or loan will cost less depends on the details of each. Compare offers from your school’s bootcamp ISA and lenders that provide soft-credit preapprovals.

Consider the affordability of the monthly payment and the total overall costs when evaluating your options.

This calculator will help you determine the overall price of an ISA for comparison.

Source: nerdwallet.com

How Blogging Paid Off My Student Loans

How Blogging Helped With Paying Off Student Loans

How Blogging Helped With Paying Off Student LoansIn July of 2013, I finished paying off my student loans.

It was a fantastic feeling and something I still think about to this day. Even though I have a success story when it comes to paying off student loans, I know that many others struggle with their student loan debt every single day.

The average graduate of 2015 walked away with more than $35,000 in student loan debt, and not only is that number growing, the percentage of students expected to use students loans is on the rise. Plus, if you have a law or medical degree, your student loan debt may be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

This is a ton of money and can be quite stressful.

After earning three college degrees, I had approximately $40,000 in student loan debt.

To some, that may sound like a crazy amount of money, and to others it may seem low. For me, it was too much.

At first, paying off student loans seemed like an impossible task, but it was an amount I didn’t want to live with for years or even decades. Due to that, I made a plan to pay them off as quickly as I could.

And, I succeeded.

I was able to pay off my student loans after just 7 months, and it was all due to my blog.

Yes, it was all because of my blog!

Without my blog, there is a chance I could still have student loans. My blog gave me a huge amount of motivation, allowed me to earn a side income in a fun way, and it allowed me to pay off my student loans very quickly.

I’m not saying you need to start a blog to help pay off your student loans, but you might want to look into starting a side hustle of some sort. Blogging is what worked for me, and it may work for you too.

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I believe that earning extra income can completely change your life for the better. You can stop living paycheck to paycheck, you can pay off your debt, reach your dreams, and more, all by earning extra money.

This blog changed my life in many other ways, besides just allowing me to pay off my student loans. It allowed me to quit a job I absolutely dreaded, start my own business, and now I earn over $50,000 a month through it.

If you are interested in starting a blog, I created a tutorial that will help you start a blog of your own for cheap, starting at only $2.95 per month (this low price is only through my link) for blog hosting. In addition to the low pricing, you will receive a free blog domain (a $15 value) through my Bluehost link when you purchase at least 12 months of blog hosting. FYI, you will want to be self-hosted if you want to learn how to make money with a blog.

Below is how blogging helped me pay off my student loans.

Quick background on my student loans.

In 2010 I graduated with two undergraduate degrees, took a short break from college, found a job as an analyst, and in 2012 I received my Finance MBA. Even though I worked full-time through all three of my degrees, I still took out student loans and put hardly anything towards my growing student loan debt.

Instead, I spent my money on food, clothing, a house that cost more than I probably should have been spending, and more. I wasn’t the best with money when I was younger, which led to me racking up student loan debt.

After receiving my undergraduate and graduate degrees, the total amount of student loans I accumulated was around $40,000.

Shortly after graduating with my MBA I created an action plan for eliminating my student loans, and in 7 months was able to pay them all off. It wasn’t easy, but it was well worth it.

The biggest reason for why I was able to pay off my student loans is because I earned as much money as I could outside of my day job. I mystery shopped and got paid to take surveys, but the biggest thing I did was I made an income through my blog.

I worked my butt off on my blog.

Any extra time I had would go towards growing my blog. I woke up early in the mornings, stayed up late at night, used lunch breaks at my day job, and I even used my vacation days to focus on my blog.

It was a huge commitment, but blogging is a lot of fun and the income was definitely worth it.

While I was working on paying off student loans, I earned anywhere from $5,000 to $11,000 monthly from my blog, and that was in addition to the income I was earning from my day job.

This helped me tremendously in being able to pay off my student loans, especially in such a short amount of time.

My blog allowed me to have a lot of fun.

One reason why I was able to work so much between my day job and my side hustling is that I made sure my side hustles were fun. Because I didn’t like my day job, I knew I just didn’t have it in me to work extra on something everyday if I didn’t enjoy it.

That’s where blogging came in.

Blogging is a ton of fun, and I have made many great friends. At times it can be challenging (the good type of challenging!) but also a lot of fun. I love when I receive an email from a reader about how I helped them pay off debt, gave them motivation, taught them about a certain side hustle, and more. Helping others along the way is another part of what really makes it worthwhile.

The fun I had blogging made it feel like a hobby, and that’s why I was able to put a crazy number of hours into it.

I focused on growing and improving my blog.

I knew I had to keep earning a good income online in order to pay off my student loan debt, so I made sure that I spent time growing and improving my blog as well. Since I love blogging so much, this was a fun task for me.

Improving my blog included learning about social media, growing my website, knowing what my readers want, producing high-quality content, keeping up with changes in the blogging world (things change a lot!), and more.

I put nearly every cent from side hustling towards paying off student loans.

One thing I did with the extra income I earned each month was putting as much of it as I could towards paying off student loans, and this way I wasn’t tempted to spend the income on something else.

So, as I earned money from my blog, I put it towards paying off student loans as quickly as I could.

This is probably easier said than done, though.

When you start earning a side income it can be very tempting to buy yourself some things. After all, you are tired, you have been working a lot, and therefore you may justify purchases to yourself.

But before you know it, you may have just a fraction of what you’ve earned left and able to put towards paying off your student loans.

It’s better to think about WHY you are side hustling and put a majority of the income you earn towards that instead.

I stayed positive when paying off student loans.

It was hard to manage everything. I was working around 100 hours each week between my day job and my side jobs, which left little time for sleep or seeing loved ones.

Luckily, I love blogging and that made it much easier to spend so much time on my blog. Watching my student loans get paid off and the debt going down was a huge motivator.

At first I thought it was impossible, and now I know it wasn’t!

Paying off my student loan debt has been one of the best choices I have ever made.

Do you have student loan debt? How are you paying off student loans?

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FAFSA Simplification: 8 Changes to Expect

Long-awaited changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form aim to make completing the form easier, unlocking aid to pay for college. The simplification effort also expands eligibility for many types of student aid.

Changes include a much shorter form where the number of questions is based on your family’s financial situation.

The FAFSA Simplification Act was bundled into the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021, which included the second coronavirus relief bill. The changes to the FAFSA are effective as of July 1, 2023, for the 2023-2024 academic year and afterward.

Here’s what’s in store for the new FAFSA and other updates to financial aid:

1. The FAFSA will have fewer questions

There are currently 108 questions on the FAFSA.

On the new FAFSA form, the total number of questions you answer will depend on your financial situation, but the maximum will be 36. Some questions have multiple parts.

2. Two roadblock questions will be removed

Students no longer must register for the Selective Service in order to complete the FAFSA, and the question will be removed from the application.

Drug-related convictions alone will no longer disqualify applicants, and the question won’t be included on the FAFSA.

3. The application will be translated into more languages

The current FAFSA is in only English and Spanish. FAFSA simplification aims to make the application easier for more students and their parents who don’t speak those languages.

The new form will be available in at least 11 languages.

4. It will be clearer if you need to include assets

Currently, aid applicants have to include their own or their parents’ assets when applying for federal student aid to provide a full picture of their financial situation. Otherwise, applicants must answer a series of questions about taxable income to apply without consideration of assets (called the Simplified Needs Test).

The act exempts applicants from having to disclose assets if they meet any of the following requirements (tax information will be imported to the application directly from the IRS):

  • They’re a non-tax filer.

  • They qualify for an automatic zero or negative Student Aid Index (and subsequently are set to receive the maximum Pell Grant award).

  • They (for independent students) or their parents (for dependent students) have an adjusted gross income of less than $60,000 (and do not file a tax return with lettered schedules A-H or file a Schedule C with net business income over $10,000 loss or gain).

  • They received a means-tested benefit, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

5. More factors added to cost of attendance

The amount of financial aid you’re eligible for is calculated by subtracting your Expected Family Contribution (soon to be Student Aid Index) from the school’s cost of attendance.

The FAFSA simplification effort adjusts cost of attendance to include more factors and rules:

  • Colleges can no longer set the housing allowance to zero for students living at home with their parents.

  • Meal plans must assume students are receiving three meals a day.

  • Colleges must include the cost of obtaining a professional license, certification or other professional credential.

  • Private student loans are no longer included in the allowance for loan fees (however, private loans often don’t charge fees as federal loans do).

6. Student Aid Index replaces the EFC

The Expected Family Contribution, or EFC, is getting a new name: Student Aid Index, or SAI.

The SAI, like the EFC, is used to calculate most financial aid (all except Pell Grants). Your need will be calculated as cost of attendance minus Student Aid Index and other financial assistance.

The makeover is meant to correct the assumption that the calculation equals the amount your family can contribute, as the name suggests. Most families pay more than the EFC amount after taking loans to fill aid gaps. In reality, the EFC (soon to be SAI) is an index number used by college financial aid offices to determine your need for aid.

The information you include on the FAFSA determines your SAI; it equals the sum of your parents’ available income, your income and your assets.

7. Receiving a Pell Grant award will get easier

Pell Grant eligibility will be simplified. Maximum annual grants, for example, will go to students — or, if dependent, their parent or parents — who fall below the income thresholds for tax filing. Maximum grants will also go to those with adjusted gross incomes below 225% (single) or 175% (married) of the poverty line.

The act also extends Pell Grant eligibility for students who previously received a Pell Grant if they were unable to complete their studies due to the closing of their school or if their loans were discharged under borrower defense to repayment. It also restores Pell Grant eligibility to incarcerated students.

8. Applicants may get more need-based aid

Applicants will see their Student Aid Index set to zero automatically if they’re eligible for the maximum federal Pell Grant. The new formula would also allow an SAI of less than zero (negative $1,500). Both changes will allow applicants to receive more need-based aid.

Source: nerdwallet.com

The Millennial Guide to Getting a Personal Loan

The Millennial Guide to Getting a Personal Loan – SmartAsset

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your financial details.

Personal loans have made something of a comeback over the last few years thanks to the rise of online lending. According to TransUnion, the number of consumers who are using personal loans jumped by 18% between Q3 2013 and Q3 2015. Millennials, in particular, are increasingly relying on them to consolidate debt or finance big purchases. Here’s a rundown of what 20-somethings need to know about applying for a personal loan.

Online Lenders and Traditional Banks Aren’t the Same

In the past, if you needed to borrow money you had to head to a brick-and-mortar bank to do it. The online personal loan industry has changed all that and millennials have more choices when they need loans. There are, however, some differences to keep in mind.

Because online banks tend to have fewer overhead costs, they can often afford to offer the most credit-worthy borrowers lower interest rates than traditional banks. They may also charge fewer fees. With a regular bank, however, you’ve got the advantage of dealing with a loan officer face-to-face, which may come in handy if you have a question or a problem later on.

Many online lenders also take a different approach when it comes to underwriting. Upstart and SoFi, for example, cater to millennial borrowers and both consider not just your credit score and your income but your long-term financial outlook when making lending decisions. With a traditional bank, your personal merits are less likely to factor into whether or not you’re able to get approved.

Check Your Credit Before You Apply

Even though online lenders may be a bit more flexible, they’re still going to take a look at your credit score when you apply. Considering that some online lenders charge interest rates as high as 36%, you need to know what kind of deal you can expect to get.

Take a look at your credit report from each of the three credit reporting bureaus – Equifax, Experian and TransUnion – to make sure your accounts are being reported properly. If you see an error, it’s best to dispute it as soon as possible. Otherwise, it could pull your score down and you could end up with a higher interest rate on a personal loan.

If you’re still in your 20s and you don’t have a substantial credit history yet, you might face an uphill climb to getting a loan. Paying your student loans and other bills on time each month and applying for a secured credit card with a low limit are two effective ways to establish credit. Payment history accounts for 35% of your FICO score so it’s a good idea to focus on that area if you’re aiming to get a personal loan with the best rates.

Crunch the Numbers on the Payoff

Personal loans aren’t open-ended, which means you have a fixed amount of time to pay them back. Depending on the lender, the loan term may last anywhere from one to five years.

If you’re in your 20s and you’re not making a lot or you’re balancing student loan payments, you need to be sure that you can afford the monthly personal loan payments. Missing a payment could do serious damage to your credit. Doing the math is also important where the interest is concerned.

For example, let’s say you want to borrow $5,000 to consolidate credit card debt. Bank A offers you a 3-year loan with a 12% simple interest rate while Bank B is offering you a 5-year term at a 10% simple interest rate. On the surface, the lower rate seems like the better deal but if you go with Bank B, you’ll end up paying at least $700 more in interest.

If you’re on the lookout for a loan, using our personal loan calculator can help you figure out the true cost of borrowing.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/Lorraine Boogich, ©iStock.com/filo, ©iStock.com/GlobalStock

Rebecca Lake Rebecca Lake is a retirement, investing and estate planning expert who has been writing about personal finance for a decade. Her expertise in the finance niche also extends to home buying, credit cards, banking and small business. She’s worked directly with several major financial and insurance brands, including Citibank, Discover and AIG and her writing has appeared online at U.S. News and World Report, CreditCards.com and Investopedia. Rebecca is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and she also attended Charleston Southern University as a graduate student. Originally from central Virginia, she now lives on the North Carolina coast along with her two children.
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Source: smartasset.com

How to Escape Debt in 2016

How to Escape Debt in 2016

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your financial details.

The new year is right around the corner and if you’re like most people, you’ve probably got a running list of resolutions to achieve and milestones to reach. If getting out of debt ranks near the top, now’s the time to starting thinking about how you’re going to hit your goal. Developing a clear-cut action plan can get you that much closer to debt-free status in 2016.

1. Add up Your Debt

You can’t start attacking your debt until you know exactly how much you owe. The first step to paying down your debt is sitting down with all of your statements and adding up every penny that’s still outstanding. Once you know how deep in debt you are, you can move on to the next step.

2. Review Your Budget

A budget is a plan that sets limits on how you spend your money. If you don’t have one, it’s a good idea to put a budget together as soon as possible. If you do have a budget, you can go over it line by line to find costs you can cut out. By eliminating fees and unnecessary expenses like cable subscriptions, you’ll be able to use the money you save to pay off your debt.

3. Set Your Goals

At this point in the process, you should have two numbers: the total amount of money you owe and the amount you can put toward your debt payments each month. Using those two figures, you should be able determine how long it’s going to take you to pay off your mortgage, student loans, personal loans and credit card debt.

Let’s say you owe your credit card issuer $25,000. If you have $500 in your budget that you can use to pay off that debt each month, you’ll be able to knock $6,000 off your card balance in a year. Keep in mind, however, that you’ll still need to factor in interest to get an accurate idea of how the balance will shrink from one year to the next.

4. Lower Your Interest Rates

Interest is a major obstacle when you’re trying to get out of debt. If you want to speed up the payment process, you can look for ways to shave down your rates. If you have high-interest credit card debt, for instance, transferring the balances to a card with a 0% promotional period can save you some money and reduce the amount of time it’ll take to get rid of your debt.

Refinancing might be worth considering if you have student loans, car loans or a mortgage. Just remember that completing a balance transfer or refinancing your debt isn’t necessarily free. Credit card companies typically charge a 3% fee for balance transfers and if you’re taking out a refinance loan, you might be on the hook for origination fees and other closing costs.

5. Increase Your Income

Keeping a tight rein on your budget can go a long way. But that’s not the only way to escape debt. Pumping up your paycheck in the new year can also help you pay off your loans and increase your disposable income.

Asking your boss for a raise will directly increase your earnings, but there’s no guarantee that your supervisor will agree to your request. If you’re paid by the hour, you can always take on more hours at your current job. And if all else fails, you can start a side gig to bring in more money.

Hold Yourself Accountable

Having a plan to get out of debt in the new year won’t get you very far if you’re not 100% committed. Checking your progress regularly is a must, as is reviewing your budget and goals to make sure you’re staying on track.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/BsWei, ©iStock.com/marekuliasz, ©iStock.com/DragonImages

Rebecca Lake Rebecca Lake is a retirement, investing and estate planning expert who has been writing about personal finance for a decade. Her expertise in the finance niche also extends to home buying, credit cards, banking and small business. She’s worked directly with several major financial and insurance brands, including Citibank, Discover and AIG and her writing has appeared online at U.S. News and World Report, CreditCards.com and Investopedia. Rebecca is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and she also attended Charleston Southern University as a graduate student. Originally from central Virginia, she now lives on the North Carolina coast along with her two children.
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Start-Up Business Loan Options

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

It can cost a lot of money to start a business, and most individuals don’t have all the capital they need up front, so they turn to a lender for help. Start-up business loans are offered by financial institutions to help business owners with a new business’s costs. While they’re a great concept, start-up business loans can be quite challenging to acquire.

These loans are risky for lenders, so the approval process can be laborious. Luckily, there are many options to consider.

How Can You Fund Your Start-Up?

When it comes to finding a start-up, business owners have several options available to them.

SBA Microloans

The US Small Business Administration (SBA) has a microloan program that offers loans up to $50,000 for small businesses and not-for-profit childcare centers. The average microloan is $13,000.

The SBA provides funds to specially designated nonprofit community-based organizations that act as intermediary lenders. These intermediaries administer the microloan program for eligible business owners. Here’s a list of providers.

Each of these intermediary lenders has its own set of unique requirements for borrowers. Typically, the intermediary lender will require some collateral from the business owner for the loan. These microloans can be used for working capital, inventory, supplies, furniture or fixtures. Microloans can’t be used to pay existing debts or purchase real estate.

Business owners who apply for SBA microloan financing may be required to fulfill training or planning requirements before being considered for the loan. The microloan downside is the “micro” part: Funding may not be sufficient for all borrowers.

The repayment terms on the microloan will vary depending on factors such as the loan amount, the planned use of the funds and the small business owner’s needs. Generally, the interest rates range between eight and 13 percent. Additionally, the maximum repayment term allowed for an SBA microloan is six years.

Other Microlenders

There are nonprofit organizations that are microlenders for small business loans. These microlenders are generally considered an easier route than an SBA microloan, especially for individuals with questionable credit history. A nonprofit microlender usually focuses on offering loans to minority or traditionally disadvantaged small business owners. Additionally, they help out small businesses in communities that are struggling economically.

These microlenders offer good term rates and allow business owners to establish better credit. This can help the business owner get other types of financing later on.

Individuals may consider a nonprofit microlender for a variety of reasons:

  1. Because profit is not their objective, the loan terms are fair and don’t take advantage of people in difficult situations.
  2. In addition to financing, many microlenders offer free consulting and training, helping small business owners make the right decisions to build their credit.

Business Credit Cards

You have a credit card for your personal expenses, so why not for your business expenses? Business credit cards can be an alternative financing solution to start-up business loans. To qualify for a business credit card, the lender will typically look at your personal credit score and combined income (business and personal).

One of the main benefits of a business credit card is that it allows you to, right away, separate your business and personal finances. You will start establishing business credit, which will help you in the future with additional business financing. Additionally, many business credit cards have great sign-up bonuses or rewards, such as cash back.

Some owners may incorrectly assume that it’s a poor decision to rely on a credit card for business expenses. However, having and using a business credit card is much more common than you may realize. In a 2019 survey from the Federal Reserve Banks, it was revealed that 59 percent of small business applicants use credit cards to fund their business.

If your score or income is low, you may have to consider a secured business credit card. Secured credit cards often come with higher interest rates and higher fees, so whenever possible, you’ll want to opt for an unsecured credit card.

Even if you receive an unsecured credit card, a low credit score will mean your interest rates on the card are higher than average. That’s why it’s essential you try to improve your credit before applying for a business credit card.

Personal Funding

You can also consider personal funding options to start up your business. Some examples are personal loans, dipping into your savings or home equity or personal credit cards. However, you should understand the risk of using this type of financing for your business. You will want to do some realistic calculations and ensure the business will be able to stand on its own without relying on further personal funding down the road.

If you use a personal credit card for business expenses, make sure you make payments right away and watch your credit utilization ratio. You should be aware that mistakes can significantly destroy your personal credit score, which will have serious consequences.

If you have a good amount in your personal savings, using this money is smart because you won’t have to pay interest on it. However, you’re ultimately taking a high risk. If your business doesn’t do well for a while, you won’t have savings to tide you over. The same applies to borrowing against your home equity. It will likely be a cheap option, but it comes with a significant risk.

If you do choose to use personal funding to start your business, make sure you take steps to start establishing business credit as quickly as possible. This will allow you to leverage business credit to gain more financing in the future and make the transition from personal financing to business avenues.

Lastly, you may consider branching out and asking friends or family for money. Make sure not to apply too much pressure, and give them the option of declining. 

Grants

Both private foundations and government agencies offer small business grants. These can be quite difficult to get, but it’s worth trying, as it would essentially be free capital.

Grants are often offered for specific groups, such as grants for US veterans or female entrepreneurs.

Venture Capital Investments

If you believe your business idea has the potential for massive growth, you may consider pitching it to venture capitalists. A venture capital investment gives you money in exchange for an ownership share or active role in the company. These investors can be individuals or part of a venture capitalist firm

The benefit of a venture capital investment is that it’s not a loan, so you’re not acquiring debt. Instead, the third party offers capital in return for equity. However, this does mean a higher risk, as you may end up paying them out significantly more if your business yields high returns. You’re also often giving up some control of your company to the investor.

Crowdfunding

Platforms like KickStarter have made crowdfunding an easily accessible and valid option for individuals wanting to start a business. You typically share your business plan and objectives with a public forum and hope people make donations or backings to fund the project.

These campaigns take lots of marketing effort but can get significant funding if they’re successful.

Which Option Is Best for You?

It can be difficult to know which of these options is the right approach for your business. However, we’ve broken down how you can better identify which solution works for you:

  1. First, determine how much funding you’ll need to start. This number will automatically rule out some of the options.
  2. Next, determine your credit score—both your personal score and business score (if applicable). Once again, this may rule out some funding options if your credit score is too low. For your personal consumer credit scoring, consider credit repair services to work on your credit score so you have more funding options available to you in the future.
  3. Understand that some of the business funding options will require collateral. Complete an analysis of your assets and identify if you have any collateral to offer up.
  4. When you apply for most types of financing, you’ll be required to share certain documents. You can have these documents prepared ahead of time. Some of the most common documents needed are a business plan, a business forecast, a business credit report, a personal credit report, tax returns, applicable licenses and registrations and legal contracts, to name a few.
  5. It’s essential that you only borrow an amount you can repay. Sometimes, you’ll be approved for much more than you think you need. Avoid taking it just because it’s offered to you.

More than anything, applying for start-up business loans starts with your credit. You should know your credit score, identify whether it’s low and consider credit repair services if needed. Ultimately, the higher your credit score, the better rates and financing options you’ll receive. Lexington Law can help with all your credit needs, so get started today.


Reviewed by John Heath, Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Born and raised in Salt Lake City, John Heath earned his BA from the University of Utah and his Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University. John has been the Directing Attorney of Lexington Law Firm since 2004. The firm focuses primarily on consumer credit report repair, but also practices family law, criminal law, general consumer litigation and collection defense on behalf of consumer debtors. John is admitted to practice law in Utah, Colorado, Washington D. C., Georgia, Texas and New York.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

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3 Things Startups Should Know About Using P2P Loans

3 Things Startups Should Know About Using P2P Loans – SmartAsset

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Starting a new business requires a certain level of commitment. You’ll also need to have access to plenty of money. Startups often have a hard time qualifying for business loans. But peer-to-peer (P2P) lending could be a financing option worth considering if you can’t get funding elsewhere. Here’s what you need to know about using P2P loans to kickstart a business.

Check out our personal loan calculator.

1. You May Have to Apply for a Personal Loan

Getting a personal loan to support a business isn’t the same thing as getting a business loan. That’s something to keep in mind since borrowing limits for personal P2P loans may not be as high as they are for business loans.

Lending Club, for example, lets you borrow up to $40,000 for a personal loan. But the maximum borrowing limit for business loans is $300,000. If you want a business loan, your company needs to be at least two years old and you need to have at least $75,000 in annual sales.

If you can’t qualify for a business loan, you may need to take out more than one personal loan. But by taking on more debt, it may take longer for your business to become profitable.

2. Lenders Will Look at Your Personal Credit History

When you’re trying to get a personal loan through a P2P lender, your odds of being approved hinge solely on your personal credit history. Every P2P lender has its own credit rating system for borrowers. Finding someone who’s willing to loan you money may be difficult if you have bad credit.

Get your free credit score now.

Before you start shopping around for a loan, it’s best to learn about the credit requirements that different P2P lenders have. Then you can check your credit reports and scores to see how you measure up. If your score is lower than you expected it to be, you might want to put off launching your business. The higher your credit score, the more appealing you’ll be to P2P loan investors (and you’ll probably have access to better loan terms).

3. You’ll Be Personally Responsible for What You Borrow

Getting a personal loan to fund your new business will be one challenge. Another will be paying back what you borrow. If your business doesn’t do as well as you’d hoped, that won’t change your responsibility to the P2P lender or the investors who funded your loan.

If you default on the loan, your lender may sue you. And your personal assets could be seized (depending on the way your business is structured). Before you commit to a P2P loan, you’ll need to know exactly what you’ll be risking if things don’t work out.

Related Article: How to Get a Personal Loan

Final Word

As you’re comparing P2P lenders, it’s important to pay attention to interest rates and fees. Compared to banks, peer-to-peer loans often come with higher rates, which increase the cost of borrowing. If you want the best deal on a loan for your new business, it’s best to shop around.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/alvarez, ©iStock.com/danielfela, ©iStock.com/PeopleImages

Rebecca Lake Rebecca Lake is a retirement, investing and estate planning expert who has been writing about personal finance for a decade. Her expertise in the finance niche also extends to home buying, credit cards, banking and small business. She’s worked directly with several major financial and insurance brands, including Citibank, Discover and AIG and her writing has appeared online at U.S. News and World Report, CreditCards.com and Investopedia. Rebecca is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and she also attended Charleston Southern University as a graduate student. Originally from central Virginia, she now lives on the North Carolina coast along with her two children.
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How to Start Investing in Peer-to-Peer Loans

How to Start Investing in Peer-to-Peer Loans – SmartAsset

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Back in the day, if you needed a personal loan to start a business or finance a wedding you had to go through a bank. But in recent years, a new option has appeared and transformed the lending industry. Peer-to-peer lending makes it easy for consumers to secure financing and gives investors another type of asset to add to their portfolios. If you’re interested in investing in something other than stocks, bonds or real estate, check out our guide to becoming an investor in peer-to-peer loans.

Check out our personal loan calculator.

What Is Peer-to-Peer Lending?

Peer-to-peer lending is the borrowing and lending of money through a platform without the help of a bank or another financial institution. Typically, an online company brings together borrowers who need funding and investors who put up cash for loans in exchange for interest payments.

Thanks to peer-to-peer lending, individuals who need extra money can get access to personal loans in a matter of days (or within hours in some cases). Even if they have bad credit scores, they may qualify for interest rates that are lower than what traditional banks might offer them. In the meantime, investors can earn decent returns without having to actively manage their investments.

Who Can Invest in Peer-to-Peer Loans

You don’t necessarily have to be a millionaire or an heiress to start investing in peer-to-peer loans. In some cases, you’ll need to have an annual gross salary of at least $70,000 or a net worth of at least $250,000. But the rules differ depending on where you live and the site you choose to invest through.

For example, if you’re investing through the website Prosper, you can’t invest at all if you reside in Arizona or New Jersey. In total, only people in 30 states can invest through Prosper and only folks in 45 states can invest through its competitor, Lending Club.

Certain sites, like Upstart and Funding Circle, are only open to accredited investors. To be an accredited investor, the SEC says you need to have a net worth above $1 million or an annual salary above $200,000 (unless you’re a company director, an executive officer or you’re part of a general partnership). Other websites that work with personal loan investors include SoFi, Peerform and CircleBack Lending.

Keep in mind that there may be limitations regarding the degree to which you can invest. According to Prosper’s site, if you live in California and you’re spending $2,500 (or less) on Prosper notes, that investment cannot be more than 10% of your net worth. Lending Club has the same restrictions, except that the 10% cap applies to all states.

Choose your risk profile.

Becoming an Investor

If you meet the requirements set by the website you want to invest through (along with any other state or local guidelines), setting up your online profile is a piece of cake. You can invest through a traditional account or an account for your retirement savings, if the site you’re visiting gives you that option.

After you create your account, you’ll be able to fill your investment portfolio with different kinds of notes. These notes are parts of loans that you’ll have to buy to begin investing. The loans themselves may be whole loans or fractional loans (portions of loans). As borrowers pay off their personal loans, investors get paid a certain amount of money each month.

If you don’t want to manually choose notes, you can set up your account so that it automatically picks them for you based on the risk level you’re most comfortable with. Note that there will likely be a minimum threshold that you’ll have to meet. With Lending Club and Prosper, you can invest with just $25. With a site like Upstart, you have to be willing to spend at least $100 on a note.

Should I Invest in Peer-to-Peer Loans?

Investing in personal loans may seem like a foreign concept. If you’re eligible to become an investor, however, it might be worth trying.

For one, investing in personal loans isn’t that difficult. Online lenders screen potential borrowers and ensure that the loans on their sites abide by their rules. Investors can browse through notes and purchase them.

Thanks to the automatic investing feature that many sites offer, you can sit back and let an online platform manage your investment account for you. That can be a plus if you don’t have a lot of free time. Also, by investing through a retirement account, you can prepare for the future and enjoy the tax advantages that come with putting your money into a traditional or Roth IRA.

As investments, personal loans are less risky than stocks. The stock market dips from time to time and there’s no guarantee that you’ll see a return on your investments. By investing in a peer-to-peer loan, you won’t have to deal with so much volatility and you’re more likely to see a positive return. Lending Club investors, for example, have historically had returns between 5.26% and 8.69%.

Related Article: Is Using a Personal Loan to Invest a Smart Move?

But investing in peer-to-peer loans isn’t for everyone. The online company you’re investing through might go bankrupt. The folks who take out the loans you invest in might make late payments or stop paying altogether.

All of that means you could lose money. And since these loans are unsecured, you can’t repossess anything or do much to recoup your losses.

You can lower your investment risk by investing in different loans. That way, if someone defaults, you can still profit from the loan payments that the other borrowers make. But if you don’t have enough loans in your portfolio you’re putting yourself in a riskier predicament.

Final Word

If you’re looking for a way to add some diversity to your portfolio, investing in peer-to-peer loans might be something to think about. There are plenty of benefits that you can reap with this kind of investment. Before setting up an account, however, it’s important to be aware of the risks you’ll be taking on.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/bymuratdeniz, ©iStock.com/M_a_y_a, ©iStock.com/sirius_r

Amanda Dixon Amanda Dixon is a personal finance writer and editor with an expertise in taxes and banking. She studied journalism and sociology at the University of Georgia. Her work has been featured in Business Insider, AOL, Bankrate, The Huffington Post, Fox Business News, Mashable and CBS News. Born and raised in metro Atlanta, Amanda currently lives in Brooklyn.
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Deferment and Forbearance of Student Loans

Deferment and Forbearance of Student Loans – SmartAsset

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Deferment and forbearance are options that people struggling to keep up with their student loans can use to make sure they don’t get into serious trouble. Falling behind on your payments can hurt your credit or lead your lenders to garnish your wages, neither of which outcomes anyone wants. If you are struggling with loan payments, a financial advisor may be able to help.

Deferment and Forbearance Defined

Both deferment and forbearance allow you to temporarily stop making payments or reduce your payments on your student loans without causing you to fall behind on what you owe. However, each program differs in the type of relief it provides.

Even though both allow you to halt or reduce your student loan payments, you may not be responsible for interest that accrues during deferment. This depends on the type of loan you have and if it’s subsidized or unsubsidized:

Interest Responsibility for Deferment
– Direct Subsidized Loans
– Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans
– Federal Perkins Loans
– The subsidized portion of Direct Consolidation Loans
– The subsidized portion of Federal Family Education Loans (FFEL) Consolidation Loans
– Direct Unsubsidized Loans
– Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans
– Direct PLUS Loans
– FFEL PLUS Loans
– The unsubsidized portion of FFEL and Direct Consolidation Loans

In forbearance, you’re on the hook for the interest that accrues on any type of loan while you aren’t making payments.

Interest that accrues during deferment and forbearance can be capitalized, or added to your principal balance, or you can pay it off as it accrues. If you have it added to your principal balance, the total amount you owe and your monthly payments may cost more. This means it could take you longer to pay back your loans.

Deferment Eligibility Requirements

To qualify for deferment, you’ll need to meet a few requirements.

  • You’re enrolled at least part-time and you’ve received a Direct PLUS loan or FFEL PLUS loan as a graduate or professional student. Deferment is allowed for an extra six months after you’ve dropped below half-time enrollment.
  • You are a parent who received a Direct PLUS loan or FFEL loan on behalf of a student who meets the above requirement.
  • You’re enrolled in an approved graduate fellowship program.
  • You are enrolled in an approved rehab training program for the disabled.
  • You’re unemployed or not able to find full-time work for up to three years.
  • You are going through an economic hardship for up to three years.
  • You’re in the Peace Corps for up to three years.
  • You are on active duty military service. Deferment is also allowed up to 13 months following that service or until you return to college or a qualifying school at least half-time (whichever is sooner).

Remember that even if you qualify for deferment, you might still be on the hook to pay for the interest that adds up during that deferment period, depending on the type of loan.

Forbearance Eligibility Requirements

If you’re exploring forbearance as an option, there are two different types: general and mandatory.

General forbearance is available if you’re experiencing problems affording your basic needs or medical expenses. It may also be available if you’ve had a recent change in employment. It may be wise to talk to your loan provider to see if your specific situation qualifies you for forbearance.

On the other hand, only Direct and FFEL loans qualify for mandatory forbearance. It becomes available if:

  • You’re serving a medical or dental internship or residency program.
  • The total amount you owe each month for all your loans is 20% or more of your total monthly gross income (available up to three years, and qualifies on Perkins loans, too).
  • You’re serving in AmeriCorps and received a national service award.
  • Your current teaching status would qualify you for teacher loan forgiveness.
  • You qualify for partial repayment through the U.S. Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program.
  • You’re a member of the National Guard, but not eligible for military deferment.

Both general and mandatory forbearance can be granted for up to 12 months at a time. If you have a Perkins loan, you have a three-year cumulative limit for general forbearance. Direct and FFEL loans don’t have the same limitation, but your loan provider may have its own limitations.

Since there is a 12-month term, you’ll need to apply for forbearance each time you need it. Some loan providers may set a maximum limit on how many times you can receive general forbearance, but mandatory forbearance doesn’t have the same restrictions.

Deferment and Forbearance Alternatives

If you don’t qualify for deferment or forbearance, you may be able to access other debt assistance programs, such as:

  • Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) Plans – These are federal student loan repayment plans that are based on your monthly income and family size. There are four IDR plans for which you may qualify.
  • Direct Consolidation Loan – This option allows you to combine all your federal student loans into one loan. You’ll have one monthly payment rather than many different payments spread out across different loans. You may get a lower monthly payment because your new loan terms can be up to 30 years, rather than the standard 10-year repayment term.
  • Refinance – Refinancing is when you take out one new loan, pay all your outstanding loans, and then make one monthly payment to your new lender. You can refinance both federal and private student loans. Your new interest rate is based on your creditworthiness, so if you don’t have excellent credit, you could end up paying more in interest than if you didn’t refinance. Before refinancing, compare lenders to see if they offer benefits best for you.

Bottom Line

Falling behind on student loan payments can hurt your financial future for years to come. You may be able to avoid this, though, by using deferment or forbearance to hit the pause button on your payments. While these programs are meant to help you, interest may still add up while you’re not making payments, which can potentially raise the cost of your payments down the road.

To find out if you qualify for either deferment or forbearance, you’ll need to submit a request on the U.S. Department of Education’s website. Your specific financial situation will dictate which choice is best for you. Most requests have their own unique form to complete, meaning there is no form for both deferment and forbearance.

Tips for Paying Back Student Loans

  • If you’re not sure of the best strategy for paying back your student loans, consider working with a financial advisor. Finding the right financial advisor that fits your needs doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with financial advisors in your area in five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that will help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.
  • It may sometimes seem as if your student loan payments will never end. A good start is to pay more than the minimum monthly payment every month, which will pay off the loan faster and save you money in the long run.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/zimmytws, ©iStock.com/Anchiy, ©iStock.com/MonthiraYodtiwong

Dori Zinn Dori Zinn has been covering personal finance for nearly a decade. Her writing has appeared in Wirecutter, Quartz, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Huffington Post and other publications. She previously worked as a staff writer at Student Loan Hero. Zinn is a past president of the Florida chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and won the national organization’s “Chapter of the Year” award two years in a row while she was head of the chapter. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Florida Atlantic University and currently lives in South Florida.
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