Could You Move With 30 Days Notice? Now You Can!

Sometimes you have a “normal” home buying or selling process. The agreements are done, you have 45 days until closing and your lists are prepared to help you move. But, sometimes, that perfect home comes out of nowhere, and you have less than 30 days to get your life packed and onto the next adventure. Sounds stressful, right?

Lucky for you, our friend, Jennifer Ciani, of blog Simply Ciani, is here to share her expert tips (as this is a real-life story of her current moving situation).

How much moving supplies will you need?

When moving, it can feel like the number of things you own doubles overnight, am I right?  The guide below can help you figure out how many boxes you will need for each room.

Tip: Don’t just pack up and move unwanted items from one home to the next; take this opportunity to sort through things into “keep” and “donate” piles. Visit these resources for more decluttering tips during a move.

Jennifer typically uses between 75 to 90 boxes for moving a three-bedroom home. You can always return what you do not use, but it’s better to have more than enough rather than making run after run back to the store to buy more!

The Art of Tape

Now that you’ve assembled the boxes you need, another vital piece of the equation is the tape you use. Spoiler Alert: the tape you use to wrap your holiday gifts is not going to cut it. Jennifer recommends investing in good, sturdy tape, like Heavy Duty Scotch Tape, so that your items arrive at your destination in the condition you packed them in. The last thing you need is the bottom of your box to fall open after you spent all that time wrapping up your belongings.

Jennifer’s Taping Tip: Tape the box across both flaps, then tape once down the center line, then again on either side of that, overlapping the sides of the tape to create a strong hold.

 Labeling

Label each box so that it has a final destination and anyone picking up the box can figure out where it goes. And be sure to label not where they came from in your current home, but where you want them to go in your new home. For an organization bonus, label some of the contents in the box so you can be sure the contents are going to the right room.

What to Pack First

Okay, it’s almost time to get to work packing everything up. Remember, good prep is half the battle for acing your move! Before you begin going room by room, Jennifer recommends setting aside a suitcase (or a few depending on the size of your family) along with two large boxes and a medium sized box. The suitcases are for your travels if you’re moving long-distance, and the boxes are you “first night boxes” in your new home. Here’s a cheat sheet of what to pack in each:

Packing Room by Room

Bathroom:

Start in the bathroom because it is the smallest room in the home and usually has the least amount to pack. Pack up all liquids and lotions, each in their own separate plastic bag. Place those in a box by themselves, separate from everything else.

The Kids Room:

If you have children, especially young ones, get them involved with the packing. Let them choose which items they want to pack up and make a game out of it! Try to see who can pack their boxes faster or count how many items fit into a box, or sort toys by colors. The more you involve your children, the less anxiety they will have.

Closets and Dressers:

Pack clothes first and leave the clothes on the hangers, placing a plastic trash bag over them for easy storage and unpacking in your new home. For clothing in dressers, take out the drawers of the dresser on moving day, load the dresser, then place the drawers back in them with the clothing still inside. As you fill up the truck, the other furniture and boxes will ensure that your drawers will not open and it’s one less thing you don’t have to worry about packing!

Home Decor and Dishes:  

Wrap breakable decor up with quality packing paper. Each item gets wrapped individually. One of the easiest ways to pack dishes is to place a foam paper plate in between each plate, then wrap the whole set up in bubble wrap. For coffee mugs and breakable glasses, wrap them with packing paper and pots and pans wrap up with extra bath towels.

Bedding:

Pack each bedding set together, including throw pillows. This way, once your beds are all set up, it is easy to put each one together again.

Garage and Tools:

Packing plastic wrap is great for keeping rakes/ mops/ brooms together, but when it comes to the tools, you might want to purchase large plastic totes to ensure that none of the tools get damaged in the move. Plus, it makes for easy organizing after moving into your new home.


Living the millennial life with my husband and Wheaten Terrier in beautiful Virginia. I document my life on Instagram and am ready to talk all things home-related at a moment’s notice.

Source: homes.com

How to Adjust Your Federal Income Tax Withholding Allowances

My husband and I were recently shocked by the amount of our income tax refund. At first, we were elated. It was enough to pay off our car, allowing us to live debt-free. At the same time, we were kicking ourselves for not having this money available for use during the past year.

Maybe you’ve had a similar experience — or the opposite (and decidedly less pleasant) one where you’ve had to pay more money in federal income taxes than you expected. Regardless, the issue is the same.

In both these situations, the amount withheld from your paycheck isn’t coinciding with the amount you really owe.

The best way to fix it is to adjust your federal income tax withholdings, which you can do in a few simple steps. But only make such an adjustment if you’re sure you need to.

When to Adjust Your Income Tax Withholding

You can adjust your withholding at any time. However, many life events can impact your taxes, so it’s a good idea to update your withholding whenever something significant changes.

These life events are a red flag you may need to revisit your withholding.

1. You Started a New Job

When you get a new job, your employer requires you to fill out a W-4 so they can determine how much federal income tax to withhold from your paycheck.

It may seem like just another routine part of your onboarding paperwork, but it’s crucial to complete the form accurately to ensure you won’t end up with an unexpected year-end tax bill.

2. You Got a Big Refund

If you received a large tax return from the IRS for last year’s taxes, that means your employer was taking too much money out of your paycheck. It’s exciting to get a big check, but think of it this way:

That’s money that belongs to you that you were essentially loaning the government interest-free. If you didn’t do that, not only could you have used that money throughout the tax year to pay for your expenses, but you could also have invested it and received interest on it.

It’s exciting when you can do something smart with your tax refund, but it is not the best financial situation.

For example, say you got a refund of $1,000. You gave the government $1,000, and the government gave you back $1,000.

Had your tax withholding amount been correct, you could have invested that $1,000 or had it available in an emergency fund instead. Instead, you gave the federal government an interest-free loan.

The IRS will only refund the amount you overpaid, with no interest. So your goal should be to have zero tax refund, or close to it.

3. You Owe Money to the IRS

It’s an awful feeling when you owe a large amount of money to the government, especially if you thought you might be getting a refund. But as with anything you must save up for, you need to put a little extra money aside with each paycheck to cover a considerable expense.

One way to do that is not to have the money in your possession at all. Out of sight, out of mind. Increase your withholding so the government gets the money before you receive it.

For example, if you owe $1,000 and get paid weekly, you can spread that $1,000 out over 52 weeks. So instead of owing the government $1,000 in one lump sum, give them an extra $20 each week to avoid owing when you file your taxes at the end of the year.

4. You’re Expecting Life Changes

When your life changes, so do your taxes.

Did you get married? Have a baby? Buy a home? Start giving charitable contributions? Are you expecting any of these changes in the next year?

All these things affect your taxable income and tax breaks like itemizing versus claiming the standard deduction or claiming the child tax credit. So take the opportunity to review your tax withholding and adjust accordingly.


How to Adjust Your Federal Tax Withholding

To adjust the amount of taxes withheld from your paycheck, the first step is on you, and the rest is on your employer. There are a few different methods to determine the withholding that makes the most sense for your tax situation.

Before you get started, have your previous year’s tax documents handy as well as your last pay stub.

1. Form W-4 Employee’s Withholding Certificate

If it’s been a few years since you filled out a Form W-4 for your job, you might think you need to calculate the number of allowances you need to claim to get the right withholding. But allowances aren’t part of Form W-4 anymore.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2018 eliminated personal exemptions — a set amount taxpayers could deduct for themselves, their spouse, and each of their dependents

The old allowance method of calculating withholding was tied to those exemptions, so it didn’t make sense to use them anymore, and Form W-4 was redesigned in 2020 to reflect a new way of estimating your tax liability. Now, it includes just a handful of steps to help you complete the worksheet and adjust your withholding.

If you and your spouse are a two-earner household, pay special attention to Step 2, whether you’re going to be married filing jointly or separately, as it has instructions for joint filers that both hold jobs.

If you need more help, the IRS has a more user-friendly tool: a withholding calculator.

2. IRS Withholding Calculator

The easy-to-use IRS Tax Withholding Estimator is on the IRS website. To use it, you answer a series of questions about your filing status, dependents, income, and tax credits. That’s where having your previous tax documents and last pay stub comes in handy.

3. Fill Out a New Form W-4

Once you’ve used the Tax Withholding Estimator tool, you can use the results of the calculator to fill out a new Form W-4. Give it to your employer’s human resources or payroll department, and they’ll make the necessary adjustments.

Some employers have an automated system for submitting withholding adjustments, so check with your employer to see if they have this option available.

It’s a good idea to take action as soon as you know you need to adjust your withholding since it will impact every paycheck you earn for the rest of the year.


Final Word

The lower your withholding, the less tax your employer will withhold from your paycheck. That may seem like a good thing, but you don’t want to have too much withheld or you could be liable for an underpayment penalty when you file.

Managing taxes can be confusing, and withholding is just the first of many things you need to know to handle your taxes well. For more guidance, check out our complete tax filing guide.

Source: moneycrashers.com

How to Design a Home for Every Climate

The decision to build your own home is not one to be taken lightly. Not only is the process time consuming and expensive, but there are a wide variety of things that need to be taken into account when creating a dream home. Outside of the more traditional checklists that include layout, amenities, renewable energy options and proper HVAC design, an element that is often overlooked is creating a home that works with—not against—it’s surrounding environment.

Once the decision of where to build has been made, consider the average climate. Ask yourself: what are the issues you might deal with on a day to day basis? Then work to implement exterior and interior features that will help prevent potential issues down the line. For example, if you live in a colder climate, you’ll want to use gable roofing to help shed snow and south facing windows to increase your daily sun intake. But you’ll want to avoid uneven walkways that make shoveling snow impossible and high ceilings that will collect and waste heat. The Zebra took a look at the four most common climates for home builders, and broke down home design tips per climate to help maximize your home’s efficiency throughout the year no matter where you live.


Source: homes.com

The psychology of being overworked and underpaid

Stressed woman with hands on her head looking at a laptop.

The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice. See Lexington Law’s editorial disclosure for more information.

A competitive salary is something we all strive for in our careers, but for some, the salary we know we deserve doesn’t necessarily match our reality. An employee may put in extra hours, take on more responsibilities and go the extra mile, but they still may not be properly compensated for their work. 

Being overworked and underpaid isn’t as uncommon as we think. According to a poll conducted by Gallup, 43 percent of U.S. workers believe they are underpaid. 

Unfortunately, this can have a negative impact on a person’s productivity, mental health and even credit health. So, what can you do if you feel you’re not being fairly paid at work? 

Read on to find out the psychological impact of being overworked and underpaid and how you can combat this issue—or jump straight to the infographic below. 

Impacts of being overworked and underpaid

Sometimes we’re so eager to accept a job that we settle for whatever salary we’re offered, only to find out that what we’re given doesn’t match the responsibilities we’ve taken on. Or, you may have been at a company for a while and experienced an increase in your workload but seen little to no increase in pay. 

Being overworked and underpaid can ultimately lead to a multitude of feelings that can cause more harm than good. Here are three signs you shouldn’t ignore:

Decrease in productivity

Employees who work long hours and have heavier workloads aren’t necessarily the most productive. Some may think the more hours you work, the more you’ll get done, but for most, this can have the opposite effect.

The more work an employee takes on, the more prone they become to mistakes. This can lead to feelings of burnout, sleep deprivation and work-life imbalance due to stress and the inability to keep up with the heavy workload. On top of that, if you’re being underpaid, it can make it extremely difficult to stay motivated in your role. 

Gallup found that 23 percent of employees felt burnt out almost always at work, according to a study made up of 7,500 full time employees. When it becomes hard to juggle workplace stress, people can find it difficult to function and stay productive. The same study conducted by Gallup also found that 13 percent of workers are less confident in their work performance when experiencing symptoms of burnout.

13% of workers are less confident in their work performance when feeling burnt out. Source: Gallup.

Employees may start to feel disconnected from their work and may even have built up resentment toward their employer because of their lack of compensation, causing a never-ending cycle of stress, burnout and lack of productivity. These feelings can ultimately impact employees’ overall well-being and mental health. 

Negative effects on your mental well-being 

Most people spend the majority of their time in the workplace. Unfortunately for some, the stresses from work can be hard to shut off even when leaving the office for the day. According to a study conducted by Wrike, 94 percent of employees said they felt stress at work and 54 percent said the stresses from work negatively affect their home life.

57.9% of employees said work has impacted their mental health in some way. Source: Paychex.

Long work hours, an increase in work-related tasks and insufficient pay can all start to take a toll on a person’s physical and mental health. A survey conducted by Paychex found that 57.9 percent of employees said work impacted their mental health in some way. 

Damaged credit health  

Aside from mental health and productivity, being underpaid can start to hurt your financial standing. Though your income doesn’t have a direct impact on your credit score, lack of income can make it more difficult to pay your bills on time. A survey by WalletHub found that 30 percent of respondents missed credit card payments because they didn’t have enough money. 

30% of people missed credit card payments because they didn’t have enough money. Source: WalletHub.

A Gallup poll also found that 55 percent of women feel they are underpaid for the amount of work they do, which could play into why they hold nearly two-thirds of the student loan debt in the U.S. With women receiving lower-than-average wages, keeping up with student loans and other debt payments becomes harder, thus affecting their overall credit health. 

6 ways to handle being underpaid 

Being underpaid is a problem that many people find themselves in and struggle to get out of. The only way to get out of this predicament is to take matters into your own hands. Here are six ways you can get out of being underpaid: 

1. Negotiate a competitive raise

Present your employer with an exact dollar amount and provide documentation of your work and performance.

Asking for a raise can seem scary and intimidating, but it’s an important step toward solving your problem. Though it’s not always the easiest thing to do, you’ll never know if you don’t ask. 

When asking for a raise, make sure you do your research on your industry’s salary range and provide an exact number when meeting with your employer. Providing an exact dollar amount as opposed to a salary range will show your employer that you know what you want and will make the negotiation process easier. Try aiming a little higher than what you would like to leave room for negotiation. When researching salary ranges, tools like Salary.com and LinkedIn’s salary tool can be a huge help. 

To support your case, come to the meeting with documentation to show your work and accomplishments thus far. Provide hard data, numbers, positive feedback you’ve received in the past and all of the ways you have helped and plan to help increase the company’s bottom line. The more evidence you provide, the better chance you have at landing that raise. 

2. Review company growth path and policies 

Schedule an official performance review with your employer to discuss your progress and an increase in pay.

Most companies give performance reviews and have a growth path clearly noted, so it may be worth revisiting your company policies first. Growth paths are important in understanding what’s expected from your employer in order to progress within the company and earn a higher wage. 

If you haven’t received an official review, get one on the schedule with your boss. A 2018 report found that 68 percent of executives say they learn about employees’ concerns for the first time during performance reviews. If you’re concerned about your growth within the company, don’t wait for your employer to come to you about it. 

3. Start a conversation about your workload

Consider decreasing your hours to alleviate workplace stress and create a healthier work-life balance.

If you’re continuing to work long hours and find the pay still isn’t worth it, it might be beneficial to have an open and honest conversation about the amount of work you’ve taken on. If your employer is unable to give you a raise, you may want to discuss cutting back on your hours or workload.

The result may not be an increase in pay, but you may be happier in your role and be able to perform better if they ease up on your day-to-day tasks. Your pay sometimes isn’t worth being unhappy at work. In fact, one of our studies on employee happiness found that 60 percent of Americans said they would take a job they loved with half their current income over one they hated. 

Employers may not be aware of the impact the extra work is having on you, so always try your best to be transparent about your load to find a healthy compromise. 

4. Start exploring other options 

Aside from monetary benefits, take other factors into consideration, such as health insurance coverage and time-off policies.

If your request for a raise gets denied and you still find yourself in the same predicament, you might want to start exploring other options. In fact, those experiencing symptoms of burnout at work are 2.6 times as likely to actively be looking for another job. 

Though monetary benefits are usually of the utmost importance, remember to consider other factors like health insurance options, flexible hours, vacation policies and overall company culture. The issues you experience in your current position can help you determine what you’re looking for in your next role. 

5. Consider quitting your job 

Make sure you’re in a good financial standing and have at least 3 to 6 months of pay saved.

At the end of the day, no job is worth putting your mental health at risk. If your current employer isn’t paying you what you deserve and you don’t feel fulfilled in your role, consider moving on. Now that you’ve done extensive research on your industry’s salary range, you’ll know what range to keep in mind when applying for other positions. 

Before jumping the gun and resigning from a position, make sure you’re financially prepared. In these situations, it’s smart to have at least three to six months’ worth of pay saved to give you some cushion during your job search. It may become more difficult to get approved for a credit card without a job, so having saved up income can help ensure you’re able to pay your credit balance. 

6. Know your worth 

Use Glassdoor’s Know Your Worth tool to compare salary levels according to location, experience level and job title.

Understanding your own worth means being clear on the value you can bring to a company. When you know your worth, asking for a raise and vocalizing your concerns will start to come naturally to you. 

Assess your own skills and level of expertise and be realistic with yourself. Once you’ve analyzed your own skills and industry’s expectations, you’ll have a better understanding of an appropriate wage. Glassdoor has a Know Your Worth tool that can help you determine salary ranges by title, experience level and location. 

The most important thing to remember is to not sell yourself short. Research from Glassdoor found that 59 percent of employees did not negotiate salary and accepted the first offer they were given. Know your worth and don’t settle for less than what you deserve. 

Money isn’t everything when it comes to employment, but it can certainly start to impact your career and personal growth if it remains stagnant. If your paycheck isn’t reflecting your worth, take action and make sure you’re getting the compensation that will set you up for further financial success. 

For tips on how to handle being overworked and underpaid, check out our infographic below.


Reviewed by Kenton Arbon, an Associate Attorney at Lexington Law Firm. Written by Lexington Law.

Kenton Arbon is an Associate Attorney in the Arizona office. Mr. Arbon was born in Bakersfield, California, and grew up in the Northwest. He earned his B.A. in Business Administration, Human Resources Management, while working as an Oregon State Trooper. His interest in the law lead him to relocate to Arizona, attend law school, and graduate from Arizona State College of Law in 2017. Since graduating from law school, Mr. Arbon has worked in multiple compliance domains including anti-money laundering, Medicare Part D, contracts, and debt negotiation. Mr. Arbon is licensed to practice law in Arizona. He is located in the Phoenix office.

Note: Articles have only been reviewed by the indicated attorney, not written by them. The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, act as legal, financial or credit advice; instead, it is for general informational purposes only. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client or fiduciary relationship between the reader, user, or browser and website owner, authors, reviewers, contributors, contributing firms, or their respective agents or employers.

Source: lexingtonlaw.com

Spring Wedding? Tips on Saving Money on Your Destination Wedding

Are you planning for a spring wedding? You are not alone; many love birds like planning their destination wedding for this time of the year. Spring is that unique season of the year where love is in the air, flowers are blooming as plants are blossoming.

Unfortunately, a wedding budget can kill your dream of a spring wedding before it sees the light of day. The question is; can you still enjoy an awesome wedding on a tight budget? Indeed you can. Our tips on saving money on your destination wedding have got you covered.

Spring Destination WeddingSpring Destination Wedding

Choose a Resort Offering an All-Inclusive Bundle

All-inclusive wedding bundles will enable you to get a flat rate on your whole wedding package. In fact, they can save you hundreds and even thousands on your wedding if done right.

These bundles may include food, sporting activities, drinks, makeup services, spa services as well as other guest events. As for drinks, you can have any of the three below:

  • Cash bar
  • Open bar
  • Consumption bar

A consumption bar can help you strike a balance between your guests getting some free drinks and paying for extra ones. You can make the bar open to your guests but set a spending threshold or a time limit with the owner. If the guests hit the limit or reach the set time, it can then be converted to a cash bar. This will save you money.

Another advantage of wedding bundles is that costs involving decoration, parking, photo sessions, and transport are reduced since your location is the same.

Combine Your Wedding and Honeymoon

Some resorts will offer you incentives and discounts if you combine your wedding with your honeymoon. Having your destination wedding and your honeymoon in the same location will help you save on traveling and other costs

You should, however, visit the place prior to the wedding to make sure it is diverse and interesting enough for both occasions. Another way to save would be to pack travel-sized items that you will need for your honeymoon to avoid buying from vendors.

Slash your Guests List

Naturally, a destination wedding doesn’t attract hundreds of guests; this ultimately reduces the financial pressure that comes with your wedding. Still, if there is a way you can further slash the guest list, do it by all means. 

Select an Offseason Date For Your Wedding.

Offseason wedding dates attract low rates and costs charged on weddings by resorts. Find out places which offer discounts for weddings on certain dates. As good as it sounds to your pocket, it is important to make sure that the dates you choose for your wedding won’t lead to a low turnout.

Additionally, for wedding festivities, you can choose a weekday to ensure even as guests come they won’t be overstaying as they also need to get back to their commitments.

You can also save your wedding costs by scheduling your wedding for a less traditional time of day. If for example the ceremony is planned for a weekday afternoon, the venues will charge less as compared to a Saturday afternoon event. Your guests might even drink less.

Consider Local Lenders for Your Wedding Supplies

Not everything you need for your destination wedding can be found where you are going to wed. You may need additional items and services. Consider local vendors who can offer reasonable prices from the wedding location rather than bringing vendors from home.

If you come with your vendors you have to cater for their travel and accommodation costs. Furthermore, if they are bringing items with them to a different country, you will have to cover the shipping cost directly or they will be indirectly included when you get priced.

Make sure you get recommendations from family and friends about the best vendors from where you are going to wed. You can also use Google and social media to find good vendors in advance.

The Take-Away

Destination weddings are the trend nowadays; this doesn’t mean you need to break the bank to have one. With proper planning, flexibility, and any of the above tips that suit you, you can whisk your love away to say ‘I Do’ in a destination of your dreams.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Solo travelers rejoice: Why I’m in favor of new Amex Centurion Lounge guest rules – The Points Guy


Solo travelers rejoice: Why I’m in favor of new Amex Centurion Lounge guest rules


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

7 amazing awards TPG staff are booking with Ultimate Rewards points this year – The Points Guy


How TPG staff are redeeming Ultimate Rewards in 2021 – The Points Guy


Advertiser Disclosure


Many of the credit card offers that appear on the website are from credit card companies from which ThePointsGuy.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). This site does not include all credit card companies or all available credit card offers. Please view our advertising policy page for more information.

Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Source: thepointsguy.com

Someone Took Out a Loan in Your Name. Now What?

Wise Bread Picks

Identity theft wears many different faces. From credit cards to student loans, thieves can open different forms of credit in your name and just like that, destroy your credit history and financial standing.

If this happens to you, getting the situation fixed can be difficult and time-consuming. But you can set things right.

If someone took out a loan in your name, it’s important to take action right away to prevent further damage to your credit. Follow these steps to protect yourself and get rid of the fraudulent accounts.

1. File a police report

The first thing you should do is file a police report with your local police department. You might be able to do this online. In many cases, you will be required to submit a police report documenting the theft in order for lenders to remove the fraudulent loans from your account. (See also: 9 Signs Your Identity Was Stolen)

2. Contact the lender

If someone took out a loan or opened a credit card in your name, contact the lender or credit card company directly to notify them of the fraudulent account and to have it removed from your credit report. For credit cards and even personal loans, the problem can usually be resolved quickly.

When it comes to student loans, identity theft can have huge consequences for the victim. Failure to pay a student loan can result in wage garnishment, a suspended license, or the government seizing your tax refund — so it’s critical that you cut any fraudulent activity off at the pass and get the loans discharged quickly.

In general, you’ll need to contact the lender who issued the student loan and provide them with a police report. The lender will also ask you to complete an identity theft report. While your application for discharge is under review, you aren’t held responsible for payments.

If you have private student loans, the process is similar. Each lender has their own process for handling student loan identity theft. However, you typically will be asked to submit a police report as proof, and the lender will do an investigation.

3. Notify the school, if necessary

If someone took out student loans in your name, contact the school the thief used to take out the loans. Call their financial aid or registrar’s office and explain that a student there took out loans under your name. They can flag the account in their system and prevent someone from taking out any more loans with your information. (See also: How to Protect Your Child From Identity Theft)

4. Dispute the errors with the credit bureaus

When you find evidence of fraudulent activity, you need to dispute the errors with each of the three credit reporting agencies: Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. You should contact each one and submit evidence, such as your police report or a letter from the lender acknowledging the occurrence of identity theft. Once the credit reporting bureau has that information, they can remove the accounts from your credit history.

If your credit score took a hit due to thieves defaulting on your loans, getting them removed can help improve your score. It can take weeks or even months for your score to fully recover, but it will eventually be restored to its previous level. (See also: Don’t Panic: Do This If Your Identity Gets Stolen)

5. Place a fraud alert or freeze on your credit report

As soon as you find out you’re the victim of a fraudulent loan, place a fraud alert on your credit report with one of the three credit reporting agencies. You can do so online:

When you place a fraud alert on your account, potential creditors or lenders will receive a notification when they run your credit. The alert prompts them to take additional steps to verify your identity before issuing a loan or form of credit in your name. (See also: How to Get a Free Fraud Alert on Your Credit Report)

In some cases, it might be a good idea to freeze your credit. With a credit freeze, creditors cannot view your credit report or issue you new credit unless you remove the freeze.

6. Check your credit report regularly

Finally, check your credit report regularly to ensure no new accounts are opened in your name. You can request a free report from each of the three credit reporting agencies once a year at AnnualCreditReport.com. You can stagger the reports so you take out one every four months, helping you keep a close eye on account activity throughout the year. (See also: How to Read a Credit Report)

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Someone Took Out a Loan in Your Name. Now What?

Source: wisebread.com