Philadelphia Neighborhood Guide for History Buffs

Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, or home of the Liberty Bell is a charming place to live. If you’re an art lover that loves to create, a pet lover or coffee lover, there is a place in the city for you (as well as deliciously famous Philly cheesesteaks). Our city guide below will help you find the best bars, neighborhoods and apartments that Philly has to offer.

Source: rent.com

Best Neighborhoods to Move to in Nashville | ApartmentSearch

High-rise building in Nashville's city.Are you thinking about making Music City your new home? With its vibrant downtown, ample outdoor space, delicious southern food, and country music galore — there’s so much to love! Whether you’re a young family on the move or a mobile, dog-loving professional, these cool neighborhoods in Nashville have a little something to offer everyone. Learn the best suburbs of Nashville and which one is right for you with this handy neighborhood guide.

The Gulch

The Gulch is the fastest-growing neighborhood in Nashville, and for good reason. Packed with restaurants, shops, bars, fitness studios, and some of Nashville’s trendiest apartments, this area attracts young professionals who enjoy being center of the action.

Nashville is also one of the best U.S. cities for dating — making this small neighborhood a prime location for singles. The Gulch is the perfect home for anyone with the “work hard, play hard” mentality. So, you’ll have tons of unique things to do and fun, young people to do them with!

12 South

This neighborhood spans half a mile along 12th Avenue South – hence 12 South. And it has become one of the most desirable places to live for young, remote-work professionals and families alike.

12 South is a highly walkable neighborhood, so you’ll find no shortage of hot eateries (like Burger Up and Urban Grub), coffee shops (like Frothy Monkey), and stylish clothing stores (like Reese Witherspoon’s own Draper James!). 12 South attracts Nashville natives and excited transplants alike, and it’s an excellent option for someone who always wants something to do or see.

East Nashville

While East Nashville isn’t as walkable as many of the other neighborhoods on this list, it has plenty of perks that make up for it. A hub for musicians and various creative types, East Nashville residents enjoy the neighborhood’s laidback, inclusive vibe and ample green space.

While some may describe East Nashville as “the hipster neighborhood,” it’s home to a diverse mix of creatives, young families, and professionals. You’ll find everything from rental houses to apartment buildings in this lively, on-trend neighborhood. But it’s likely a better option for those with their own vehicle.

The Nations

The Nations is one of the more affordable neighborhoods on this list – though, with how many people move to Nashville a day, it may not stay that way for long. This area was largely industrial only a few short years ago but is now exploding with restaurants, breweries, retail establishments, and residential developments.

Located around the central district of 51st Avenue and about 10 minutes from the heart of downtown, the Nations is an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s attracting a mostly younger crowd. This is a great place to look if you’re on a tighter budget and want all the amenities of a vibrant city. This hotspot will be on everyone’s list of cool neighborhoods in Nashville before long!

Germantown

Chock full of gorgeous, historic townhouses and tree-lined streets, Germantown has become known for its culinary scene. Boasting several critically acclaimed eateries, like Rolf and Daughters, City House, and Henrietta Red, residents of this beloved neighborhood will never go hungry.

Thanks to its location, only a few blocks from downtown Nashville, Germantown has prime access to the sports arenas, music venues, and other attractions in the city’s hub. This neighborhood manages to feel slower-paced and quieter than many other options and has a little something for everyone.

Sylvan Park

A young family looking to settle down should take a good look at Sylvan Park. Known by locals to be safe, quiet, and one of the best neighborhoods in Nashville to live, historic Sylvan Park is full of people who genuinely love their little community.

A quaint, walkable area, Sylvan Park boasts plenty of beloved, locally-owned restaurants, boutiques, and easy access to McCabe Park. Whether you’re raising little ones in Music City or simply enjoy a more residential feel, Sylvan Park is a growing neighborhood you shouldn’t overlook.

Make Your Move to Nashville with Apartment Search

Is there a Nashville neighborhood calling your name? Now that you’ve got an area picked out, explore available apartments on ApartmentSearch! Narrow your search by apartment size, rent amount, amenities, and more. Nashville can’t wait to have you home!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Is Your Apartment Tax-Deductible When You WFH? | ApartmentSearch

Woman holding baby while sitting at desk on computerIf you’re someone who primarily works from the comfort of their home, you might find yourself wondering, “Can I write off my home office?” This is certainly a valid question and one that can possibly save you a lot of money when tax season rolls around. Learn what (if anything) is tax-deductible when your apartment doubles as your office space!

But before we begin, please know this post is not intended as legal or tax advice; rather, it’s simply meant to provide some helpful resources for your tax journey. If you need additional support or guidance as you’re filing, we encourage you to seek professional tax prep services.

Can I write off my home office?

With so many of us working from home these days, there’s a lot of curiosity around whether this situation can yield any tax breaks. Unfortunately, you won’t qualify for the home office tax deduction as a full-time remote employee in most cases.

In other words, if you work remotely — but you’re not an employer or business owner — you won’t be able to write off your home office. With that said, this might be available as a state tax deduction for *some* remote workers, so don’t give up all hope!

Anyone who’s self-employed or runs a business out of their home will likely have better luck with this write-off. According to the IRS, there are two basic requirements to qualify for a home office deduction: (1) regular and exclusive use and (2) principal place of your business.

The term ‘regular and exclusive use’ means you regularly use part of your house or apartment exclusively for conducting your business. The second criteria (principal place of business) implies your home office is either the primary location of your business or space where you frequently meet with customers or clients.

For instance, if you run a business out of your apartment, like an e-commerce store, you may be eligible for this deduction. Likewise, if you are “self-employed” as a freelancer, you may also meet this requirement.

How do I calculate my home office deduction?

If you meet the criteria stipulated by the IRS, you’ll want to know how to deduct a home office to net the most significant savings possible. There are two ways to go about this: (1) the regular method — keeping track of your expenses throughout the year and itemizing them on your tax forms, or (2) using the simplified option (if you’re eligible for it).

The regular method involves diligent record-keeping of your year-round expenses and honest reporting in your tax form. With this method, you can write off things like the cost to paint or repair your office space, which can add up pretty quickly!

The actual-expenses approach also allows you to deduct a portion of some indirect home expenses, based on the square feet you use as your office. What this means is, if your office is one-tenth of the total square footage in your house or apartment, you can deduct 10% of your mortgage interest or rent and even some of your utilities (like water and electric bills).

The simplified version of the home office deduction can be used if your office measures 300 square feet or less. For those who qualify, the IRS will give you a deduction of $5 per square foot of your home that’s used for business, up to $1,500 for a 300-square-foot-space.

If you’re unsure which choice is right for you, know that the simplified method can work well for single-room offices or smaller operations, while actual-expenses might work better if your business takes up a larger part of your home.

Additionally, the simplified route is typically easier to compute, resulting in a smaller tax break overall. The regular method requires more thorough recordkeeping (and more time to gather your receipts), but it could provide you with a larger deduction in the end.

Find a Place for Work and Life

Are you thinking of upgrading your apartment so you can have a dedicated home office? With the help of ApartmentSearch, you can easily explore two-bedroom apartments and live-work spaces for rent near you! This way, you’ll have an extra room you can use as your very own office, which is sure to help boost your morale and productivity.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Budget-Friendly At-Home Valentine’s Date Ideas

women holding hands at homeMoney can’t buy love, but all the fancy Valentine’s date nights on your social media feeds may lead you to lose sight of this truth. Show your love this year without going over-budget with these at-home Valentine’s Day ideas that are guaranteed to please your main squeeze!

Create an At-Home Spa

Going to a spa is an expensive endeavor. Creating one at home is an affordable way to set a mood and create an environment of relaxation and peace. Opt for a relaxing bath or DIY massage coupled with candles, relaxing tunes, and fragrant essential oils or Epsom salts. Then, pamper your partner with a foot or back rub, and top things off with a sheet mask or facial treatment and a glass of wine. You and your relationship will feel refreshed and reinvigorated the day after!

Valentine’s Dinner Ideas

Food is love, and there’s no better way to show that love than by cooking up a special meal for that special someone. Think outside the box and experiment with a new recipe, an indoor picnic, or even more creative, a fondue for two! There’s just something romantic about chocolate fondue, and when you don’t have to leave home to enjoy it, that’s a bonus.

Borrow this DIY fondue night tutorial from Forkly for a deliciously melty dinner that’s sure to satisfy. To amp up the romance factor, create playlists for each other ahead of time and listen to the songs while you dip into your culinary creations. And pro tip? Make it a tech-free evening, keeping phones and even the TV off-limits for Valentine’s night.

Plan a Scavenger Hunt

A DIY scavenger hunt can take a bit of planning, but it costs next to nothing and practically guarantees a good time! Plus, with some creative thinking, your scavenger hunt can be confined to the four walls of your studio apartment or the four corners of your neighborhood!

Hide meaningful notes and trinkets in a few strategic locations, along with clues to the next treasure — the clues can be brain-teasers, inside jokes, or riddles that your partner has to figure out to get to the last stop — YOU!

Host a Movie Night

Is it a little cliche? Yes, but for good reason — it’s one of the best ways to spend the night when done correctly. Instead of just plopping on the couch with no plan like a typical TV night, make it romantic and fun creating a lineup of your partner’s favorite shows and episodes or a movie that holds special significance in your relationship. Whatever you do, add in those special touches — maybe even prepare your partner’s favorite binge-watching snack — to show just how much you care.

Learn a New Craft Together

It doesn’t matter if you’ve been in a relationship for years or you’re spending your first Valentine’s Day together. Learning something new is a great way to connect. Whether it’s knitting or wine-and-watercolor painting, you’re guaranteed to find a tutorial online that will guide you through this adventure and provide a Valentine’s Day full of crafting. The best part is that if you make a mistake, you’re both in it together.

Ready to Fall In Love with Your Home?

Does spending time at home feel more like a feat than a treat? In that case, you may want to consider moving into a different apartment that you can feel proud of! Find a place with plenty of room to entertain, make dinner, and enjoy with ApartmentSearch.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Should You Get a Master’s Degree While Working Full Time?

Professor lecturing in front of students

If you’re interested in earning a master’s degree to help you stand out from the crowd, congratulations! It’s a big move that can make a significant difference in your career! However, just like a graduate degree can help you move up the corporate ladder, the amount of time and dedication required to get one may force you to take time off work.

If you want the best of both worlds, you may want to try studying while working full-time, but that’s easier said than done! Not sure that’s the right choice for you? Before you decide what to do, ask yourself the questions below — they’ll help you assess your options and prepare for your next big step!

Question #1: Do you feel comfortable asking for help?

Let’s be real: full-time school and full-time work will put a lot of stress on you. Sometimes, you won’t have an option but to ask for help — whether that’s asking your boss to cut you some slack or asking a professor for a deadline extension.

Are you the type of person willing and able to ask for help before small issues snowball into major problems? Consider this before you decide to stick with your job while going to grad school.

Question #2: Are you ready to do your — financial aid — homework?

Working full-time doesn’t mean you won’t qualify for financial aid, grants, and scholarships. However, it does mean that you’ll have to spend time studying your financial aid options before school even starts!

The following links provide advice and resources to help pay for grad school:

  • Types of Financial Aid
  • Financial Aid for Graduate School
  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Question #3: When and how will you tell your coworkers and supervisors?

It’s impossible to avoid conflict in your life. Often, the best course of action is to get out in front of potential issues. Accordingly, you’ll want to share your plan with your boss so that if and when a conflict between your studies and your job appears, it will be easier to call out and resolve. And let’s face it, what employer doesn’t love the idea of a hardworking associate striving to learn and achieve more?

A bonus: some employers offer partial or even total tuition reimbursement if the field of study is likely to positively influence your work performance (and their bottom-line). That would take the sting out of your efforts to get a master’s while working full time!

Question #4: Can you relax?

While juggling school and work, it can be hard to take a break, relax, and rejuvenate. Regardless, it’s an integral part of earning a master’s degree while working full-time or tackling any challenge.

Despite that, many people struggle to unplug and unwind! Knowing how and when to relax is a valuable skill and one that’s worth learning before you hop into working and studying simultaneously.

Question #5: Do you have the physical and mental bandwidth for grad school and work?

It’s time for a little introspection! Reflect on what your current work-life balance looks like — do you have plenty of time left after the 9-to-5 to hang out with friends, work out, and do the other things you’re passionate about? How many hours a week are you expecting to be at school or studying? Is it going to be manageable? Meditate on these things before you make any big decisions.

Having room left in your schedule for work, life, and studies is one thing — but having space in your home to complete your professional and academic projects is another! Look around your apartment and ask yourself, “Can I create a dedicated space for my studies?”

Whether you have a dedicated home office or an unused dining space that can be converted into one, having a physical room for concentration will help you conquer work and grad school. And if you need temporary furniture to transform a space for the duration of your academic pursuits, turn to CORT Furniture Rental for temporary office and bedroom furnishings.

An Easy A: Finding Your Next Place

Whether you decide to do grad school full-time while staying at work, work and study part-time, or quit work to go to pursue a different trade entirely — ApartmentSearch has your back. Find apartments that fit your budget wherever life takes you!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Working From Your Apartment? Top Amenities to Look For

Man sitting at office desk sipping from a mug and looking at a computerWorking from home was still considered a bit taboo and somewhat of a privilege for many people until recently. According to this Gartner survey, at least 80% of surveyed company leaders plan to allow employees to continue remote work — at least part-time. Research has shown us that employee happiness and productivity seem to be highest when workers are allowed to stay at home rather than commute to an office. This trend isn’t likely to disappear anytime soon.

Alongside this, many people are relocating since they now have the flexibility to work from almost anywhere. Apartment communities are paying close attention to this boom and have begun offering additional incentives to potential tenants for choosing to rent a space within their community. So, what are some of the most popular amenities being offered to those who find themselves working from an apartment?

Enhanced Concierge Services

These add-on services are not necessarily a new thing for some higher-end properties. But now that more people are working from home, concierge services are quickly becoming more of an essential rather than a luxury. Having a service dedicated to tenants for things like fetching food orders, laundry, dog walking, and package retrieval is a perk that apartment communities may offer to accommodate their WFH tenants further.

Built-in Nooks

Many apartment complexes now offer work areas or small alcoves within the apartments themselves that can be used for a dedicated home office setup. These nooks sometimes come already equipped with a built-in desktop space or a collapsible desk shelf. They’re usually furnished with power outlets and added extras like USB plug-ins so that you can keep your devices charged and ready to go at all times.

Co-Working Spaces

Apartments with coworking spaces are already pretty commonplace in most newer apartment complexes. Still, some are offering computers, printers, larger open areas with desks, comfy couches, and conference-style rooms for tenants to work privately. This trend started as a way to encourage human interaction between people who work from home. It may still be offered in some communities, taking into account social distancing and health guidelines.

Garden-Style Apartments

Working from home may be less stressful than going to an office every day, but we all need to take time out for relaxation. Garden apartments are unique compared to concrete highrise apartments and may allow for a more zen-like work from home experience. They’re typically surrounded by lush greenery and sometimes genuine gardens that can provide a sense of calm after a long day of work.

Pre-Furnished Apartments

If you’re looking for the ideal pad for a digital nomad-lifestyle, finding furnished apartments or temporary furniture for your next short-term destination is a must! After all, without quality furniture, you won’t be comfortable in your temporary space, and buying new furniture after each move is a quick way to put a dent in your savings account!

Turn to CORT for help decking out your new, temporary digs with whole-apartment furniture rental. We’ll turn any place into a furnished space, setting up your stuff before you move in and picking it up at the end of the lease.

Upgrade Your WFH Lifestyle

Whether you’re working from home in a small apartment part-time or full-time, it’s essential to have a relaxing and comfortable living space. From built-in office nooks to dedicated co-working spaces, apartment complexes are finding new ways to get remote workers’ business. Find available apartment units that fit your needs with ApartmentSearch. Check out our free search tool today!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Tips for Dealing with Difficult Relatives During the Holidays

Older woman talking to girl with cookie in mouthIf you’ve been living solo for a while, the holiday season may mark the first time you’ll see your extended family in a long time. You may already be dreading spending your long weekends cooped up with nosy aunts and spoiled cousins!

Though we can’t give you your PTO back, we can help you maintain your sanity during family festivities. Keep your holiday season delightful— not dreadful — with these tips for dealing with difficult family members this holiday season.

Step up your self-care before, during, and after family time.

No matter how much you love your family, dealing with difficult relatives can be draining. Make sure you’re not pouring from an empty cup, so to speak, by giving yourself extra time for self-care practices in the time leading up to, during, and following family gatherings.

Step away from the group to do something that recharges you, like journaling, calling a friend, or taking a walk by yourself. The more depleted your mental energy becomes, the less likely you are to handle sticky family situations with grace, so make it a habit to check in with yourself and take a few minutes to recharge whenever you need to.

Steer the conversation with neutral topics and questions.

Maybe you don’t want to spend holidays with extended family because you know you’ll be dealing with your uncle’s political banter or listening to your cousin rehash the drama that happened at her sister’s wedding last summer.

Now is not the time for confrontation or “family therapy,” and fortunately, you can play a big part in keeping things light and fun. If you make an effort to steer the conversation, the likelihood of controversial topics arising in your discussions can diminish — at least somewhat.

Here are a few questions to ask your family at dinner to get things going (and stay in a safe conversational territory).

Neutral conversation-starters for family gatherings:

  • What’s your favorite memory from a past holiday?
  • What was your first job?
  • What was your wedding day like?
  • What do you remember about the days your children were born?
  • What’s your favorite place you’ve ever traveled to?
  • Have you seen any good movies or shows lately?
  • What’s something you’re excited about over the next few months?
  • What’s your favorite holiday tradition (or movie, or food, etc.)?
  • What’s something you’re grateful for?

If things still take a turn for the worst, you can say something like, “Let’s give the rest of the family the gift of a break from that topic, what do you say?” or be even more direct with “Let’s change the subject; I don’t want to discuss this.” Don’t be afraid to speak up!

Think about a response to personal questions in advance.

Your family is well-meaning, but sometimes they can ask questions you don’t want to answer. How are you supposed to reply to, “When are you getting married?” anyway?! While you can’t always anticipate what family members will ask, you can develop an effective way to divert nearly any personal question.

Think of a few things in your life that are going well right now — or at the very least, some topics you’d be willing to talk about with family — and change the subject to those things. For example, if someone springs a personal question about why you aren’t dating someone, you can chuckle and respond, “I don’t know about that. Hey, I got a promotion at work last month. I really love my work right now. How’s your job going?” If they persist or bring it up again, you can be more direct with a response like, “I’d prefer not to talk about that,” or you can remove yourself from the situation entirely, which leads us to our next tip…

Have an exit plan.

Sometimes, when you’re dealing with difficult family members, you need to step away. If you’re anticipating stressful situations, plan your getaway in advance. This can mean excusing yourself for a few moments of solitude in the bathroom, knowing when to return to your hotel for the night, or even being prepared to leave the situation entirely by packing up and heading home early. It’s okay to need some separation!

Limit or avoid time with family during the holidays altogether.

Speaking of separation, here’s the thing: if you don’t want to spend holidays with extended family, you don’t have to. You always have the option to do something completely different, like hosting a holiday dinner with nearby friends or neighbors. Of course, making your own plans for the holidays may come with consequences you don’t want to deal with (like hurt feelings), but in the end, it truly is YOUR decision whether you attend family gatherings.

If you’re not ready to give a big, hard “NO” to your family gatherings, consider a compromise. For example, you don’t have to schlep half your belongings to your parents’ house and essentially move back in with family for a week or two. Instead, cut your trip down to 2 or 3 days. You’ll still get to see everyone and celebrate, but you’ll save yourself from the depletion that comes from dealing with difficult family members for long periods.

Create a safe haven for yourself.

You can get through almost anything as long as you have something — or somewhere — else to look forward to, right? If you’re exhausted after spending the holidays with difficult relatives, ensure you’ll have a welcoming spot to come home to with ApartmentSearch. Use our apartment finder tool to claim your perfect place, complete with amenities, parking, and PRIVACY! Now, that’s fa-la-la-fabulous.

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Get Your Finances in Check: How to Save Money as a Renter

Woman counting cash with a planner on her desk

Did you treat-yo-self a little too hard? Getting back on track after overdoing the retail therapy can be a daunting-but-necessary task! Make staying within budget a little easier on yourself by leveraging these little-known ways to save money as a renter.

1. Modify Your Renters Insurance

You do have renters insurance, right? As a renter, it’s one of the most critical items in your apartment life toolkit! It’s a relatively small but necessary (and sometimes legally required) expense that can help protect you financially in case of apartment mishaps.

However, having renter’s insurance doesn’t mean you should settle for any policy! Take some time to review your policy now, asking the following questions as you go.

  • Can you afford a higher deductible (which lowers your premiums)?
  • Does shopping around for the best deal uncover an equally good but less effective provider?
  • Will paying annually save you money compared to paying more frequently throughout the year?

2. Meal Prep

Going out to eat is delicious and convenient, but it can also be over-indulgent in calories and costs! If your foodie ways interfere with your finances, get in touch with your inner chef, and prepare meals in the comfort of your own home. And there’s more than the financial benefit to consider: eating home-cooked meals makes people happier and healthier, says Fix.com!

Bonus foodie tip: Retain your grocery receipt, highlight perishable foods, and stick it on your fridge or in another prominent spot. This helps make sure you consume those foods before they go bad. The average American wastes about one pound of food per day; use this tip to ensure that you “waste not, want not!”

3. Sign Up for the Apartment Gym

Working out at a fancy gym is excellent. They have the latest equipment, friendly faces, and TVs you can watch while sweating your way through a treadmill workout!

Unfortunately, such gyms also come with membership fees, either monthly or annually. If your apartment complex has a small gym area, you can likely get a pretty good workout there. To supplement it, consider walking or jogging through the neighborhood and doing bodyweight exercises in a nearby park.

4. Team Up on Laundry

If you’re currently using coin-operated laundry machines, then you understand how quickly the costs add up. It’s as if the washer and dryer devour quarters! Worse yet, you pay the same for a small load as you do for a large load. However, you can overcome this particular type of money madness by teaming up with a roommate to combine hampers and get the most out of your money.

Alternatively, if your apartment has an in-unit washer and dryer — use it wisely! Combine your and your roommate’s different laundry loads — linens, lights, and darks — to get the most out of every wash.

5. Reconsider Your Internet Service

When it comes to figuring out how renters can save money, many people overlook their internet service. For a good reason: many people consider access to the internet a must. Less crucial, however, is paying more for blazing fast internet speeds and higher data limits than you need.

  • Look into a cheaper internet plan and offset data caps by borrowing DVDs and Blu-rays from the local library instead of streaming.
  • Listen to podcasts for any background noise you usually use the TV to provide.
  • See if your employer offers a stipend for internet access.
  • Get quotes from competing internet providers and ask your current provider to match them…or else!

6. Find a More Affordable Apartment

Is rent consuming a considerable portion of your monthly pay? In that case, finding a more affordable apartment can be one of the most straightforward ways to save money and stay on-budget! Start searching for a new apartment that’s priced to please!

Source: blog.apartmentsearch.com

Create a Productive Apartment Work-From-Home Space

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Working from home has become more prominent than ever, especially in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, when you’re living in an apartment, it can sometimes be challenging to create a productive remote workspace. 

Thankfully, there are things you can do to maximize your space (no matter how small it may be), arrange it in a way that inspires creativity and productivity, and take care of yourself so you stay motivated. 

Let’s take a look at some of the ways you can make the most of your apartment while you’re working from home, so you can find a healthy work-life balance and stay focused on your job each day. 

Arranging Your Space

A productive apartment work-from-home space starts with actually creating a designated workspace. You don’t necessarily need to have a separate spare room to set up an office. As long as you have a specific location in mind that is dedicated to your work, you can get things done effectively. Some suggestions include: 

  • Fixing a folding shelf to a wall.
  • Using a large closet/wardrobe.
  • Utilizing a large hallway.
  • Pulling your sofa away from the wall in the living room and using it as a desk chair.

Having your own workspace can help you to stay focused and organized throughout the day. Remember, your environment can affect your mental health. It can either keep you motivated or bring you down. So, focus on things like using natural lighting, having live plants around to give you energy, and even controlling the temperature to keep things a bit cooler. 

If you know you will have to participate in Zoom meetings or similar video chats, make sure that your office looks as professional as possible. Because you’re at home, it’s okay to make things personal. But, whatever is in your background should still suggest that you’re working. A professional background for a video call can include things like plants, pictures, and artwork, but probably shouldn’t include your Star Wars actions figures. 

Keeping Your Health in Mind

In addition to having the right space set up, it’s crucial to take care of yourself in order to stay productive. When working from home, it’s easy to feel distracted and unmotivated. Taking care of yourself, physically and mentally, can have a huge impact on how well you do your job. 

One of the potential drawbacks of working from home is having a harder time with a work-life balance. You can combat this by having a routine each day. Start work at the same time and end it at the same time. Having a separate office space in your apartment will make it easier to “walk away” from work at the end of the day. 

It’s also important to take breaks, and you may need to encourage yourself to do so. Your apartment might be small, but don’t be afraid to splurge on a few “self-care” items including, perhaps, a sofa that you can put in or near your workspace for whenever you need to take a break. 

Your breaks should also consist of movement, as much as possible. Stand up and stretch every hour. Or, take longer breaks throughout the day that allow you to get outside and go for a walk. Studies have shown that simply being out in nature can improve your mood, which may help with productivity, and it will give you a chance to get some space after being in a small apartment all day. 

It’s possible to create a productive apartment work-from-home space and to stay motivated each day. With a few simple changes, some organizational skills, and maybe a professional purchase or two, you can turn almost any area of your apartment into an effective workspace. 

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How to Create a Productive Apartment Work-From-Home Space
Article Name
How to Create a Productive Apartment Work-From-Home Space
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With a few simple changes, some organizational skills, and maybe a professional purchase or two, you can turn almost any area of your apartment into an effective workspace.
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Apartminty
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Source: blog.apartminty.com